DISCOVERIES AT SERVIA IN WESTERN MACEDONIA: 2

The large and varied ceramic repertoire included many complete vessels of the Servia variant of the MN Sesklo style with bold red on cream designs, especially from the Phase 4 destruction levels, c 4500 BC

MIDDLE NEOLITHIC MUG

MINIATURE FRUIT STAND

(upper surface)

The late Neolithic levels belong to the earliest stages of that period and are characterised by fine black burnished 'Larissa' style pottery and 'grey on grey' wares. The increasing levels of trade and contact at this period are demostrated by imports from areas as far apart as Eastern Macedonia, the North East Peloponnese and Albania. The site was abandoned before the beginning of the Dhimini phase and remained unoccupied for over 1000 years.

Fine burnished and straw impressed LN pottery has parallels at Cakran in Albania and Stavroupolis on the outskirts of Thessaloniki 

   

Reoccupation of the site took place during the Early Bronze Age c 2800-2500 BC but the remains of the earliest phase are enigmatic. A series of ditches over 3 metres deep and 3 metres wide were dug in various parts of the site, perhaps to protect individual houses or farmsteads of which no trace survives. The pottery of this Phase (Eight) has close affinities with that of northern Thessaly at Argissa for example.

After an interval the ditches were intentionally filled in and a new settlement was constructed. The inhabitants used pottery similar to that known from Central Macedonia at sites such as Kritsana, Kastanas and Toumba Thessaloniki, but also imported pottery from southern Greece including the sauceboats typical of the NE Peloponnese.

The assemblage of over 1000 small objects of stone, clay, bone and shell is an important contribution to understanding the range and function of these varied types of tool and ornament. Of particular interest are the bracelets of shell, stone and clay and the range of figurines both anthropomorphic and animal.

The abundant plant remains from the main site and the separate EN site have permitted the reconstruction of many aspects of the subsistence economy and comparison with other Neolithic sites in Greece and the Balkans.

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